The HPV Vaccine Controversy: Sex, Cancer, God, and Politics: A Guide for Parents, Women, Men, and Teenagers

July 18, 2013 - Comment

The Human Papilloma Virus, so-called HPV, is one of the most widespread sexually transmitted diseases in America, with more than 20 million infected now and more than 6 million new cases detected each year. It is estimated that at least 50 percent of all sexually active people will be infected during their lifetimes. And while

The Human Papilloma Virus, so-called HPV, is one of the most widespread sexually transmitted diseases in America, with more than 20 million infected now and more than 6 million new cases detected each year. It is estimated that at least 50 percent of all sexually active people will be infected during their lifetimes. And while the silent disease may cause no symptoms in most cases, two strains of HPV cause some 70 percent of all cervical cancer, which strikes more than 10,000 women in the United States alone each year. So it is with great fanfare than an HPV vaccine, tested around the world and approved by the US government in 2006, is being marketed. But controversy surrounds the vaccine, which is being recommended for girls as young as 9 and may be mandated by state governments. In this timely book, Shobha Krishnan, M.D., of Barnard College, Columbia University – a longtime gynecologist and family physician, and mother of a young daughter – explains in layterms both the disease and vaccine to parents, youths, men and women. She also addresses the controversy, legislative aims to require the vaccine, and another vaccine to hit the market this year. Krishnan also raises the issue of whether boys should get the vaccine. Coverage across the book is comprehensive and addresses both the pros and cons of anyone being innoculated.


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Story Circle Book Reviews says:

HPV Vaccine, Decision-Making, and Women’s Health If you care about your health, you must read this book. The HPV Vaccine Controversy: Sex, Cancer, God, and Politics. Shobha S. Krishnan, M.D. gives you practical, jargon-free information about one of the most widely spread sexually transmitted diseases–Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Krishnan reported that “Over 50 percent of sexually active men and women will acquire genital HPV infection at some point in their lives.”If that doesn’t wake you up, try these facts: You can carry HPV and never show any symptoms; HPV could cause embarrassing warts on hand, feet, and/or the area around your anus and genitals; and HPV “could lead to precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix, vulva, vagina, urethra, anus, penis, mouth, and throat.” About 250,000 women die each year from cervical cancer. 99 percent of these cases originated with the HPV virus.But rather than frighten the reader with facts and statistics, Krishnan uses a conversational tone that provides…

Lisa Fohl says:

Great book for parent for parents AND physicians I am a parent of two daughters in their early twenties and one teenage son and found this book very useful in helping us determine whether or not to recommend this vaccination to our daughters. This book presented the facts in a clear, thorough, concise, and readable fashion. In fact, it read like a novel! Ms. Krishnan does a terrific job of covering the facts without ‘lecturing’. She presents a great deal of information in a relatively short book. Krishnan also presents the information in a way that anyone reading this book will be able to comprehend.I have recommended this book for our bookclub to read. My husband is a family physician and he has recommended the book to many patients and fellow physicians. This is good information to share.Thank you Dr. Krishnan for a comprehensive, insightful and interesting review of this controversial subject!By the way, our daughters have been vaccinated based on the information gleaned from this book.

Brick ONeil "Writer" says:

The HPV Vaccine Controversy as a Reference In The HPV Vaccine Controversy, Shobha Krishnan covers quite a bit of ground. At the very beginning, she reminds the reader that this book is a reference guide for Parents, Doctors and Teenagers. It’s a dense read; one that is well-researched, well-presented and well-covered. The book covers three main areas: What HPV is, who it’s for and what should be done about it. In the first area, What HPV is, Shobha Krisnan devotes quite some time to discussing what the HPV virus is, what it isn’t, its forms and what parents should be concerned about. The HPV virus, says Shobha, is widely and readily passes from person to person, in its many different forms, via sexual or nonsexual means. It may cause simple warts to cervical and anal cancer, and may come and go on its own or require surgical excision and therapy. Since some strains of HPV may cause cervical cancer, an outline of what cancers they may cause is vastly discussed and may be beyond the reach of the lay reader…

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